The Road Home

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015

The Sounds of a Peaceful Morning Milking

I've told you before how much I enjoy milking in the mornings. Listening to the birds, the goats, and just watching the world wake up for the day. Well, recently I took the camera with me and recorded a few more short videos. Just for you. So, without further ado, A Peaceful Morning Milking.

You will notice a metalic kind of sound in this video. I have just begun to milk, and the bucket is empty. Copper fusses at me every morning because she has to wait and be second in line. She just doesn't see any reason she should have to wait for her mother, One Stripe, to be milked first. If you milk more than one doe, and are consistent with your line up, you will find that they figure out their place in line, although at first the goats new to the milking routine will try to cut line. 

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Now the sounds of milking have changed and Copper is on the stand. I was surprised at how well the sounds came out while taking these videos with my camera. Interesting. By the time I am about half way through milking Copper, the babies start to get restless because they know that they will get to have breakfast soon.

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This was the first morning I noticed one of the kids up on their 'dog house' playing. This was originally our Great Pyrenees, Pearl's, doghouse when she was a puppy. Now we use it for the kids when we pen them up away from their moms at night. The first fresheners are still fussing at me because I didn't feed them out in the feed trough like I do on most mornings. This morning, I brought them in on the milk stand to eat individually. I have been doing this off and on for a few weeks now.

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This video shows the kids 'escaping' the pen for breakfast. It's a little shaky here and there, but shows you the routine.

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Now I have Lady Bug on the stand and I'm showing you how I feel the babies kicking. You can usually, but not always, feel the babies moving around when the does are about three months into their gestation. At first the babies are higher up on the side and up closer to the rib cage. Since all of the young does are due next week, their babies have dropped down and moved back closer to the udder. All of their tail bone ligaments are very loose, and their udders are growing out nicely. I handle the does a lot when they are on the stand. I want them to be comfortable so when it comes time to be milked, that will be the only new thing added to this routine. I show you how I get them comfortable standing with a little wider stance. This gives more room for the milk bucket and for me to comfortably reach their teats to milk. It is a matter of patience and repetition. After a while they will be comfortable and not resist the repositioning of their leg. 

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This is Cricket. Here I show you how much I handle the does. At first they kind of cringe with all of this attention since they are a little skittish about being on the stand at all. But by this time they know they will get to eat while I mess with them. I've also trimmed their hooves once since I started bringing them in. It's much easier for me to have the milk stand hold the goat, and I don't have to bend over as much making it easier on my back.

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Now for the switch over. I will take Cricket out and let Penny in. Penny is the most hesitant to come in to the stand, so sometimes I have to bring her in, but she's doing better. At first when these young does left the stand they were kind of lost and didn't know which way to go, but now they have figured it out for the most part. Penny is also like her mother, Copper. She will usually come in, turn in a circle, then jump up on the stand. It's funny how that runs in families.

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I had to find an application to shorten the videos I had originally taken before Blogger would upload them. First I had to learn how to do the video on my camera, now I am having to learn how to alter them to fit into the blog format. You know, if we had never started this blog, we wouldn't have bought a new camera a year ago, and I wouldn't be learning any of this stuff. So, thank you for encouraging us in our blogging endeavors. We continue to learn much all of the time.

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As I try to think of the things we do and have learned about goats so I can share them with you, it helps me to really think through everything. I guess that can go for just about anything we do. We have felt all along that the purpose of this blog is to share what we have learned so that it might benefit others in some way. I hope that is the case.

Until next time - Fern

14 comments:

  1. Fern, thank you for the videos. It's all very interesting, and the kids and cats are so cute. I could hear the birds in the background.

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    1. I love listening to the song birds in the mornings, C.M. I told a child once many years ago that the song of the birds is just God telling us how much He loves us. I still think that. Thank you for sharing.

      Fern

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  2. Awwww. This just makes me push you to the top of my "these are great people" list. To know your goats are sensitive and react to touch just as humans do, then to follow through with it. You're good people and your "kids" are extremely lucky.

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    1. Thank you very much, L.J. Our goats serve us well, providing us with milk, cream, butter, cheese and meat. It's only fitting that we are good stewards of what we have been given. I am grateful to be able to live this life. Thank you for your kind words.

      Fern

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  3. This video is a perfect example of humane yet realistic treatment of animals. You lead by example...loving your animals but understanding their purpose in the scheme of things! Plus training them to have good manners.

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    1. It makes for a more peaceful, harmonious experience, Fiona. Thank you for your observations. It is interesting to see things from someone else's perspective.

      Fern

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  4. As for the Videos, you can always upload them to Youtube first then just link them to Blogger, then you don't have to worry about their length limits.

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    1. We have thought about YouTube, but haven't even looked into it...yet. Maybe someday we will. Thank you for the suggestion.

      Fern

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  5. Thank you for sharing these, Fern. It helps to see things as well as read about them.

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    1. You're welcome, Kathi. It always helps me when I can see a demonstration.

      Fern

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  6. I love my morning routine. It's such a joy and a nice time of prayer and thinking! :)

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    1. I think I know what you mean, Goodwife. It's especially fun when we have new babies to watch, isn't it? Thank you for sharing.

      Fern

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  7. Thank you for the informational videos! We're still working on getting established with goats, primarily for milk...great to know!

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    1. You are welcome. I'm glad this was useful. Thank you for the comment.

      Fern

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